Education
TEAACH Executive Summary

TEAACH Executive Summary

22 states have received our learnings from passing and implementing the TEAACH Act in Illinois. The TEAACH Executive Summary disseminates insights from the grassroots advocacy, legislative adoption, and statewide implementation of the TEAACH Act.

We took a four phase approach to pushing forward the K-12 Asian American history movement from a handful of states to 22 states across the country. Executive Summary & Resource Guide to launch Q1 2024.

Phase 1: Building a Movement

Lesson Learned #1: A robust, pre-existing Asian American advocacy ecosystem in Illinois incubated the K-12 Asian American history movement.

Recommendation: Consider building a longer-term advocacy infrastructure while weighing various approaches. Don’t rush. It’s better to move strategically, purposefully and collaboratively than it is to move fast and alone.

Phase 2: Creating a Mandate

Lesson Learned #1: Pre-existing education instructional mandates for inclusive history enabled the creation and passage of an Asian American history mandate.

Recommendation: Pursue broader coalitional movements for ethnic studies. If no inclusive history mandates exist, then create a more comprehensive solution to tell the stories of all marginalized communities.

Phase 3: Implementation – Making Change in Classroom and Communities

Lesson Learned #2: Working in silos can result in slow, redundant, and ineffective impact.Choosing partners who are right for the work is essential.

Recommendation: Build a collaborative ecosystem of people and organizations early on  to affect change, working with partners with the right expertise, reach, roles, resources, and a clear shared purpose. What worked well in Illinois was a public-private collaboration between the state education agency; higher education (teacher preparation and history/ethnic studies); teacher leaders; private funders; and local community organizations.

Phase 4: Sustaining, Refining, and Expanding

Lesson Learned #1: Having a clear strategic plan with a compelling vision, objectives, and well-defined roles can align a core group of changemakers seeking to make a shared impact. This impact can transform systems over time, but the work can also be long and slow. Collecting data to measure impact is essential, but it may also require time and effort.

Recommendation: Student learning is the most critical factor in this work toward change and must remain the focus and ultimate goal even at scale. Programmatic and systems-level professionals may tend toward focusing first on teachers since their work largely centers on developing support for teachers. Still, students are the true purpose of any educational change.

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22 states have received our learnings from passing and implementing the TEAACH Act in Illinois. The TEAACH Executive Summary disseminates insights from the grassroots advocacy, legislative adoption, and statewide implementation of the TEAACH Act.

We took a four phase approach to pushing forward the K-12 Asian American history movement from a handful of states to 22 states across the country. Executive Summary & Resource Guide to launch Q1 2024.

Phase 1: Building a Movement

Lesson Learned #1: A robust, pre-existing Asian American advocacy ecosystem in Illinois incubated the K-12 Asian American history movement.

Recommendation: Consider building a longer-term advocacy infrastructure while weighing various approaches. Don’t rush. It’s better to move strategically, purposefully and collaboratively than it is to move fast and alone.

Phase 2: Creating a Mandate

Lesson Learned #1: Pre-existing education instructional mandates for inclusive history enabled the creation and passage of an Asian American history mandate.

Recommendation: Pursue broader coalitional movements for ethnic studies. If no inclusive history mandates exist, then create a more comprehensive solution to tell the stories of all marginalized communities.

Phase 3: Implementation – Making Change in Classroom and Communities

Lesson Learned #2: Working in silos can result in slow, redundant, and ineffective impact.Choosing partners who are right for the work is essential.

Recommendation: Build a collaborative ecosystem of people and organizations early on  to affect change, working with partners with the right expertise, reach, roles, resources, and a clear shared purpose. What worked well in Illinois was a public-private collaboration between the state education agency; higher education (teacher preparation and history/ethnic studies); teacher leaders; private funders; and local community organizations.

Phase 4: Sustaining, Refining, and Expanding

Lesson Learned #1: Having a clear strategic plan with a compelling vision, objectives, and well-defined roles can align a core group of changemakers seeking to make a shared impact. This impact can transform systems over time, but the work can also be long and slow. Collecting data to measure impact is essential, but it may also require time and effort.

Recommendation: Student learning is the most critical factor in this work toward change and must remain the focus and ultimate goal even at scale. Programmatic and systems-level professionals may tend toward focusing first on teachers since their work largely centers on developing support for teachers. Still, students are the true purpose of any educational change.

Thank you!
Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
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